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Beaching It in the Fall

Fall is the perfect time for enjoying South Florida’s beautiful beaches. Crowds are down, school is in, and swimming, surfing, snorkeling, scuba diving, beachcombing, hiking ocean view nature trails, and picnicking along the surf is ideal for locals and visitors alike. Florida’s beaches are known for their unique pristine beauty, but activities abound year-round for those who enjoy life on the sand and in the water.

Hiking, Kayaking, Canoeing, and Paddle boarding

While a walk along the beach is lovely, many autumn beachgoers are looking for more. And they can find it in the many beaches which are part of Florida’s gorgeous state parks with trails easily hiked by all ages. Because a number of these parks are nestled between the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway, they offer, not only hiking, but kayaking, canoeing, and paddle boarding through lagoons and amid small islands often sighting wildlife galore – local plants, birds, manatees, dolphins, and more!

Snorkeling and Scuba Diving

Fall is the perfect time to explore snorkeling and diving along the coast of South Florida, where artificial and natural reef formations abound. Many favorite snorkeling spots are shore dives requiring no boat to discover an amazing array of marine life, while others diving opportunities require a short boat ride to even more adventure found among the clear waters just offshore.

Surfing and Swimming

In South Florida, both surfing and swimming are year-round because water temperatures rarely go below 70 degrees. For surfers, fall and winter are often the times of the best surfing swells. South Florida is home to a large number of surfers and, of course, the waves are less crowded during school and office hours. Swells often increase in September with the advent of the nor’easters and surfers may want to don a vest or springsuit as the temperature goes down.

Beachcombing and Shelling

South Florida beaches are well known for their natural treasures – shells, colored sea glass, sea beans, fossils, seaweed, drift wood, eggs, and more await those who enjoy spending their days along the shore beachcombing. When you find your treasure, just remember in all your excitement, it is illegal to remove living creatures from Florida beaches.

Beachcombing is practiced from the “wrack” (the high tide line of seaweed, shells, sticks, and more) down to the water’s edge. In South Florida, lucky beachcombers often find seaweed, algae, and grasses, in the colors of the rainbow – green, red, purple, brown, pink, and even white. Common algae along the Atlantic coast in South Florida are sargassum weed and sea lettuce.

Colorful sea glass and prized sea beans (aka drift seeds from tropical rain forests) are two prized beachcombing finds used by creative artisans to make beautiful jewelry. Some sea beans can even take root when planted. Sponges, sea feathers (corals), and squirts are also popular finds along the beaches of south Florida. Of course, shells are the favorite find by beachcombers everywhere. While shell treasures vary by day and by beach with no days or beaches ever the same.

Picnicking

Often combined with a day of any one of the above, picnicking along the beach is a lovely way to end a day of beaching it in the fall. Whether a simple feast of sandwiches and sodas or a fancy collection of charcuterie, cheeses, and wine, nothing beats a fall picnic along the pristine beaches of South Florida.

Are you ready for your next beach adventure? Fall is the perfect time to explore and enjoy the outdoor life along the beach in South Florida.

This has been the first camp ever that my son didn’t complain about going in the morning, but he did tell me about the friends he made and the things he did. We love this camp!

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Mrs. L

Loved the fact that the camp worked with me and kept my son very active every day. He definitely wasn’t bored.

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